Following the launch of NVIDIA’s Turing GPUs, there have been a slew of launches from various board partners, most of them returning with improved or completely revamped heatsink designs. Zotac is one of NVIDIA’s better known partners, although from our past experience with the company’s products it can be said that they seem to focus more on looks than practicality.

ZOTAC GAMING GeForce RTX 2080 AMP

Today, we are reviewing the Zotac Gaming GeForce RTX 2080 AMP. This variant is the second-in-command after the Zotac AMP Extreme that comes loaded with all the standard board-partner offerings and then some-multiple RGBs, triple fan support, two-eight pin connectors, an out-of-the-box heavy overclock and lastly not to mention the gigantic heatsink.

While on the surface, the AMP Extreme looks sick and is bigger than most third party cards, it is not the most efficient, as we saw with Pascal. It runs hotter than the rest and has an oversized built, but on the plus side, the price tends to be somewhat lower than the competition.

ZOTAC GAMING GeForce RTX 2080 AMP: Specifications

Enough about the AMP Extreme, this piece is dedicated to its younger sibling, the ZOTAC GAMING AMP. The specs are more or less the same as the Founders Edition, with a mild overclock, 14 Gbps GDDR6 memory, five output ports and two power connectors- one 6-pin and one 8-pin to feed the 225W TDP requirement.

ZOTAC GAMING GeForce RTX 2080 AMP

Our System (Test-bed)

We tested seven intensive games at the max or the near max setting pairing the 2080 with an i7-7700K and 16 GB of DDR4 memory running at 4000 GHz. All the games were installed on a WD Black 4TB HDD.

ZOTAC GAMING GeForce RTX 2080 AMP

The Witcher 3

The Witcher 3 is one of our favorite tiles and it also happens to be an excellent game for benchmarking both CPUs and GPUs. We ran the game at the absolute max setting with Hairworks and HBAO+ at their highest values. Despite being a more than two years, the RTX 2080 fails to hit the 60 FPS mark in The Witcher 3 using the Ultra preset at 4K:

Min42
Max55
Avg48

Final Fantasy XV

The Windows Edition of Final Fantasy XV is perhaps one of the prettiest games on PC at the moment. With support for nearly all the NVIDIA Gameworks effects, it allows fine-tuning of every visual setting, something the previous entries in the franchise were lacking. As for performance, the average is not that far from the Witcher 3’s, however the lows are quite….well low:

Min28
Max58
Avg46

Hellblade

Ninja-theory managed to create something of a master-piece with Hellblade. Incorporating psychosis with Norse mythology, it’s a unique experience that can also be witnessed in VR for heightened immersion. Hellblade performs nearly the same as Final Fantasy:

Min34
Max56
Avg46

Kingdom Come Deliverance

Kingdom Come Deliverance attracted many controversies, some of them completely baseless. While the campaign did end abruptly, the combat and the world were well-made and absolutely gorgeous to boot. Running the game at Ultra is quite impossible with present generation hardware, so we ran the benchmark at the High preset (at 4K):

Min28
Max48
Avg61

Assassins’ Creed Origins

Unfortunately, we didn’t have a copy of Odyssey at the time of benchmarking, so we decided to go ahead with Assassins’ Creed Origins. The game is the first AC entry lacking Gameworks effects, but despite that it’s fairly intensive and for some reason the 2080 seems to be performing worse than the 1080 Ti with the lows dropping into the single digits:

Min5
Max86
Avg54

Deus Ex: Mankind Divided

The latest Deus Ex game looks drop dead gorgeous, thanks to CHS, tessellation and a crap-ton of detail. Despite being the oldest of the bunch, it’s the most punishing though the lows are more reasonable here:

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Max49
Avg40

Ghost Recon Wildlands

Ghost Recon Wildlands has a sprawling open-world with lots of dense vegetation which takes quite a toll on even the beefiest GPUs. The ultra preset once again proves to be a bit too much for the 2080 at 4K:

Min33
Max46
Avg40

Thermals and Overclocking

The Turing GPUs run unbelievably cool with the temps barely ever crossing the 50 degree mark, that’s with the Founders Edition. The Zotac AMP stayed below the 40 degree territory at all times and the fans spin without making any audible sound. As for overclocking, let’s just say I didn’t quite hit the silicon lottery.

The card I got was an absolute peach, and refused to take anything more than +75 Mhz on the core using conventional overclocking means. However, I was successful in getting a +400 Mhz OC on the GDDR6 memory. The average performance increased somewhere from 5-10% depending on the game, although the lows benefited more from the overclock.

The Witcher 3OC FPS
Min44
Max66
Avg51
Final Fantasy XVOC FPS
Min40
Max77
Avg53
Hellblade OC FPS
Min36
Max60
Avg49
Kingdom Come Deliverance OC FPS
Min38
Max66
Avg51
Assassins’ Creed Origins OC FPS
Min4
Max89
Avg56
Deus Ex: MD OC FPS
Min33
Max48
Avg40
Ghost Recon: Wildlands OC FPS
Min36
Max48
Avg42

Conclusion

I’m gonna use Zotac’s tagline “Born to Game” here and say that if you are the kind of gamer who likes to play at the max setting at 4K or 1440p and don’t want to splurge for the more expensive 2080 Ti, then the 2080 is for you. The Zotac RTX 2080 AMP has one blue LED on the side, but other than that is lacking on the RGB front. The thermals are effective and the GPU runs real quiet. While my GPU didn’t show much of an overclocking capability, I expect most 2080s to show 15-17% performance improvements on OC’ing.

Overall, it’s a decent package, the only real question pertains to the price. Are you willing to pay $840 (80,000 INR) for a GPU that performs identical to the GTX 1080 Ti just for the ray-tracing capability. Rest assured ray-tracing supported games will be here soon enough, and they will improve quality many-fold, but what kind of frame rates will the 2080 be able to produce with RTX enabled. These are some of the lingering questions.

Pros:

  • RTX and DLSS support
  • Fantastic thermal performance
  • 4K ready with NVLink-SLI support

Cons:

  • Price-performance ratio is not that great

Further reading:

Does NVIDIA gimp previous generations of GPUs?

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REVIEW OVERVIEW
Price
Performance
Thermals
Overclocking
Built
TDP
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My interests range from Human Psychology to Computer Hardware. I'm a perfectionist and I only settle for the best, both when it comes to work and play. Yeah I know I'm no fun at parties. I started TechQuila with a friend as a hobby and currently I'm the Editor-in-Chief here. I'm also pursuing a degree in Engineering and write mainly for the Gaming and Hardware sections, although every once in a while I like to test my skills in the other categories too.

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