Over the past few two weeks or so, we’ve seen a ton of benchmarks indicating the approximate performance of the new Ryzen 3000 lineup. Although the figures have been varied across different benchmarks, there is one thing we can conclude with a good level of certainty. In multi-threaded tasks like Cinebench or Content Creation in general, the AMD chips will be much faster than the competing Intel parts. However, in single threaded applications, there won’t be much of a difference between the two. The official word from AMD is that the Zen 2 processors will be 2-3% faster in SC benchmarks, so I don’t think I’m off the mark here.

To drive my point home, take a look at this UserBench score shared on Twitter recently by TUM_APISAK. The difference between the two in gaming and day-to-day tasks (which tend to benefit from high IPC) is within single figures, but when you compare the workstation scores, the Ryzen 7 3700X pulls ahead by a margin of more than 20%.

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The same story is repeated in synthetic tests. The SC performance is identical, but the multi-core speed is much better in case of AMD’s new 7nm chips. In Passmark, the Ryzen 7 3700X is as fast as the Core i9-9900K (a $484 chip), but in the single-threaded chart, there’s not a whole lot of difference between the two, even the older Core i7-8700K is within reach.

Conclusion

Basically, what we can conclude from this is that AMD’s advantage in multi-threaded workloads will get even better with Zen 2 but in single-threaded processes, the competition will be much more intense. Here, we’ll likely see many applications where the Intel Coffee Lake CPUs end up getting the better of the 3rd Gen Ryzen parts. However, unlike the Zen and Zen+ designs, the deltas will be much smaller, almost negligible in most cases.

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