NVIDIA to End Driver Support for Mobile Kepler GPUs from April

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In a blog post, NVIDIA has announced the decision to end mainstream driver support for mobile Kepler GPUs. This means that the Kepler parts in laptops and notebooks will no longer receive Game Ready driver boosts, performance optimizations, and bugfixes. They will, however, continue to receive critical security updates for another year.

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NVIDIA will be moving the Kepler based mobile GPUs to legacy status next month, and this is somewhat unexpected as usually the whole architecture including the mobile as well as desktop parts are retired together. This either means that there are still enough GeForce gamers with Kepler based desktop cards or we’ll see an announcement signaling their end-of-cycle soon enough. NVIDIA announced the end of driver support for the older Fermi-based cards last April and seems like the Kepler mobile parts are getting the ax sooner than the former.

The Kepler mobile lineup is rather broad from the 600M series, 700M, 800M, as well as some of the 900M products. You can check the whole list here.

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Areej
I love computer hardware and RPGs, and those two things are what drove me to start TechQuila. Other than that most of my time goes into reading psychology, writing (and reading) dark poetry and playing games.

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