Intel’s Xeon server CPU roadmap for the coming three years has been posted on WikiChip. Ironically, this info was snagged from a Huawei presentation, the same company Intel and other US-based chip-makers are going to cut ties with soon. The roadmap details the 14nm Cooper Lake, and the 10nm Ice Lake-based Xeon chips and also mentions the succeeding Sapphire Rapids parts, set to launch in 2021.

Intel 10nm 7nm

14nm Cooper Lake and 10nm Ice Lake

Out of the three, Cooper Lake will be the first to debut in Q1 2020. Based on the existing 14nm(+++?) node, it’ll be available in two variants, Cooper Lake SP and Copper Lake P. The former will have up to 48 cores and will support 2-way SMP while the latter (with 26 cores) is meant for 4/8-way. Ice Lake, on the other hand, will only be available in the SP variant and like Cooper Lake SP will rely on the Whitley platform. Both will have eight DDR4 memory channels, with Ice Lake moving to PCIe4 (Cooper Lake will stick with Gen3).

Sapphire Rapids and Granite Rapids

Sapphire and Granite Rapids mark a shift in code-names from x-Lake to x-Rapids. Both of the new lineups will come with 8-channel DDR5 memory support as well as PCIe Gen5 and CXL compatibility. While Sapphire is expected to be based on the 10nm+ process, Granite Rapids will most likely leverage Intel’s 7nm node, so expect a higher jump in performance going from SR to GR compared to the IL to SR transition.

Intel 10nm Ice Lake

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In case you weren’t aware, the 10nm node promises:

  • 2.7x density scaling vs 14nm
  • Self-aligned Quad-Patterning
  • Contact Over Active Gate
  • Cobalt Interconnect (M0, M1)
  • 1st Gen Foveros 3D Stacking
  • 2nd Gen EMIB

Similarly, 7nm will deliver:

  • 2x density scaling vs 10nm
  • Planned intra-node optimizations
  • 4x reduction in design rules
  • EUV
  • Next-Gen Foveros & EMIB Packaging

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