VR may be the next big thing for the gaming and entertainment industry, but it is still far from perfect. The adoption isn’t all that widespread either. The HTC Vive and Facebook’s Oculus Rift still sport rather sub-standard resolutions of around 1080p and sometimes lower in the peripheries of the image. However, a new VR headset is on the horizon that tackles these problems by leveraging a retina display. Dubbed as the “Bionic display”, it beats the pants off mainstream high-end headsets.

Developed by Varjo, these Bionic display headsets merge two displays per eye to achieve retina-standard resolution at the focus with relatively lower image quality at the peripheries, but unless you specifically concentrate on the edges of the screen, it’s fairly hard to notice the reduced resolution.

The scene has almost no visible aliasing or blur and at times it’s hard to differentiate from reality. The visual fidelity isn’t the only impressive aspect of Varjo’s Bionic display. It also features an eye-tracking technology that as per Varjo is the most accurate version ever created, with a precision of 0.2° for emphasis.

varjo bionic display

The headset is connected to a 33 feet long tether made of fiber optic cables to retain the bandwidth. It is still as thin as regular VR tethers and also connects to a bunch of USB and display ports.

On the downside, the completed model will lack in-built audio and separate headphones will be required for complete immersion.  And then of course there’s the price. All this state-of-the-art tech comes at a premium and a pretty massive one at that. The first version of the bionic headset is expected to launch in 2019 and will cost somewhere in between $5,000 and $10,000. So yeah, it’s not for us consumers for the time being but professionals and corporate enterprises.

Further reading:

Image and data courtesy: Varjo and Road to VR

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My interests range from Human Psychology to Computer Hardware. I'm a perfectionist and I only settle for the best, both when it comes to work and play. Yeah I know I'm no fun at parties. I started TechQuila with a friend as a hobby and currently I'm the Editor-in-Chief here. I'm also pursuing a degree in Engineering and write mainly for the Gaming and Hardware sections, although every once in a while I like to test my skills in the other categories too.

3 COMMENTS

  1. retina-standard resolution? why are you using marketing works to describe a technical detail what is the resolution as retina is a apple buzz word that has no meaning

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