Intel has been trying to transition to the 10nm node since the past four years now, and although the first few (hundred) attempts might have failed, the chipmaker is finally back on track. The mobile Ice Lake parts featuring the 10nm node have already started shipping and should hit retail soon enough, while the desktop and server offerings are expected to launch next year. We’ve already seen the Geekbench for the top-end Core i7-1065G7 and it is promising to say the least. Now, our Twitter chip-detectives have spotted the mid-range i5 and a Comet Lake (14nm) part in the SiSoft Database.

10th Gen Intel Core i5-1035G4 Ice Lake CPU

First, let’s have a look at the Ice Lake chip. This is a mid-range part, namely the Core i5-1035G4 coupled with an Iris Plus like the i7-1065G7, with 56CUs clocked at 1GHz (the G7 has 64 EUs clocked at 1.1GHz). The CPU appears to be a dual-core offering clocked at 1.10GHz, with a TDP of 61W. This is a desktop part, so the core-count is probably off. We haven’t seen a dual-core i5 in quite a while and given that AMD’s Ryzen 5 chips come with six, it’ll be safe to assume that the ICL desktop i5s will also be hex-core parts.

Related:

AMD Ryzen 3600 yields 6.3% more FPS than Intel Core i7-8700: End of i5s?

10th Gen Intel

For the Comet Lake processor, the data is limited to the iGPU. This is a Gen 10 UHD graphics processor with 24CUs clocked at 1.15GHz and has been created very recently, 30th May to be exact, but doesn’t mention any info pertaining to the CPU, neither thread-count nor the clocks. The L2 cache is pegged at 512KB, although I’m not sure if this is the iGPU or CPU cache.

Are you excited about Intel’s 10nm CPUs or will you be buying AMD’s 3rd Gen Ryzen processors like most enthusiasts? Let us know in the comments below.

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3 COMMENTS

  1. Isn’t lt strange that they have been unsuccessful at 10nm fabrication when a much smaller AMD is already out with 12 core Ryzen on 7nm geometry? Has Intel ever created anything on their own? They could not even go beyond 200 mhz with their Pentium until they bought Digital and the PCI but technology. They can’t even create decent chipsets for their own processors so try and kill VIA who made the most reliable and stable chipsets in the world. They tried to kill Zotac by rejigging the functions in the processor so they could not simply go with nVidia for graphics. BTW my 8+ year old Zotac dual core Atom 330 mini-itx with just 2 gb DDR 2 ram and a 250 gb ssd runs faster than an i3-3220 with 8 gb DDR3 ram and 250 gb ssd.

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